Friday, January 23, 2009

Tea...Quince jam...

Recently I had dinner with people who were able to recite love poems...it was a very pleasant experience...as poetry always is...

Since I am still under impression of poetry...please forgive my below kind of poetic description of "hayva mürəbbəsi" i.e. quince jam :) ...I wrote earlier about our tea tradition and that we often have it with "mürəbbə" Azeri kind of jam...These are pictures of quince jam...On a cold winter day quince jam is like a sun that shines on a snow white table cloth...Those who are fond of "mürəbbə" in general appreciate this golden sour-sweet jam with rich flavour. I will share with you a secret...Next time you visit Azerbaijan and go to a restaurant order as many types of jams as the place can offer or you would be able to taste...until then I will keep you posted on different types of jams available...

As we say here "аğzınız şirin olsun" that means "let your mouth be sweet" or "have a sweet mouth" :) as weird as it may sound in English this sounds very proper and natural in Azeri. Please let me know if you can think of a better translation :)

Quince jam...which is not a jam per se...it is "mürəbbə" :)

Quince and quince jam...

Numerous guests and continuous tea sessions are a norm in Azerbaijan

Share

7 comments:

Jan said...

Ayten:

We tried very hard to grow a Quince tree in our city (Greensboro, North Carolina, USA). However, we learned that quince trees are susceptible to "quince cedar rust" which means that one year the quince trees spread a fungus to nearby cedar trees and the next year, the cedar trees spread it to the quince trees, making it very hard for them to grow in our region. Are quince trees hardy in your country?

Greensboro Daily Photo
www.greensborodailyphoto.com

Jenn said...

I've only eaten in a local Azeri restaurant once since I've been here and it was a lot of fun. I do remember there being jam on the table toward the end of the meal and I thought it was odd that some people were stirring it in to their tea...I tried it and it was really good that way. It wasn't quince jam, it was some sort of cherry I believe.

Babooshka said...

This looks delicious.

farida said...

Aytencik, yet another interesting post from you. Your pictures make me nostalgic about many things in Azerbaijan. Quince is one of my favorite fruits, especially the Ordubad variety. Quince murebbe is so delicioous!

Ika said...

My favorite "murebbe" is quince jam. Thank you :)

Leif Hagen said...

Great series of pictures! Looks like a very fun and delicious way to meet friends with tea, etc. Is crocheting a popular handiwork where you live? I noticed the fancy, white doily. I'm new to CDP; I started EAGAN daily photo. I'm thrilled to find your daily blog as I don't know much at all about your country. Greetings from Minnesota, USA

Gunn White said...

Yummy!:-)